Webinar: Syphilis Infections and the Clinical Laboratory

Syphilis infections are on the rise in the U.S., and untreated cases may result in serious complications.1

This free educational webinar is designed to increase your understanding of:

  • Syphilis infections and recent trends in the U.S.
  • U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations
  • The advantages and disadvantages of the two main types of laboratory tests for the syphilis bacteria:

         - Nontreponemal tests are based on the detection of
           antiphospholipid antibodies (IgG and IgM) formed by the
           host in response to the lipoidal material released by damaged
           host cells and from the treponeme as well.

         - Treponemal tests are based on the detection of T. pallidum-specific
           antigens.

Please note that this webinar is not approved for continuing education credit.

 

Complete the form below to view webinar:




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The webinar can be viewed on-demand at any time by clicking on the link below.

Syphilis Infections and the Clinical Laboratory
 

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1. CDC. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2010. (downloaded April 4, 2012)